Picture source: Paramount/BBC.

Let’s get this straight. Banning the Blue Story film across cinemas in the UK is not going to prevent its audience from finding somewhere else to stream the movie.

People need to open their minds and see beyond just a group of black boys stereo-typically involved with gangs, drugs and violence. That stigma is not the focus in this film.

Audiences from other backgrounds will be able to learn from this film about the type of issues a young black man goes through in the streets of London. They don’t seek trouble but being young, black and poor it comes to them.

Blue Story portrays real life and people that are surrounded by this type of background and can relate to what goes on.

Writer and director Andrew Onwubolu, aka MC Rapman, is also the creator of a three-part YouTube series named Shiro’s Story released last year. This film creates an adaptation of the trio series and touches on very similar issues facing young black men.

Timmy (Stephen Odubola) and Marco (Michael Ward) are best friends from rival postcodes, Deptford and Peckham. They struggle to remain friends as they soon find themselves in the midst of a gang war.

Rapman adds his unique musical interludes to connect with us. Movies are for entertainment but there are always life lessons and messages that are conveyed, and Blue Story provides both. The key themes that run through this film are very relevant and present in today’s society.

Blue Story adapts the idea of being violent to ‘innocent people’ and instead shows the vulnerability of the men with weapons.

Overall, the film was entertaining, funny and eye-opening.

Onwubolu’s film speaks for many not just in London but across other cities in the UK. The creator clearly wants to have an impact on his audience which is predominantly young people between the age of 15-24-years old, that are indulged in this type of lifestyle.

The film helps the audience to question themselves whether they should go down that route or escape while they can.