Police investigations into cybercrime were up 14% last year alone.

Nottinghamshire Police is warning the public to be on their guard against the growing trend of cybercrime.

Latest figures have cautioned the public that cybercrime has surged over a six month period between April to September last year.

In Nottinghamshire over 242 cybercrime cases were reported, an increase of 15 per cent, while total financial loss due to cybercrime also rose 63 per cent in the same period.

Cybercrime is where criminals, over the internet, seek to gain your personal information in order to financially benefit or commit fraud. They can do this through scam emails or by learning your passwords.

The report highlighted that the most common age group targeted by cybercrime is between 30 and 39.

A graphic breaking down the increase in cybercrime reported by Nottinghamshire Police, with individuals being affected the most.

However Nottinghamshire Police still maintain they are ‘coming on leaps and bounds to fight against cybercrime’ despite the London’s Police’s National Fraud Intelligence Bureau report.

Detective Inspector Yvonne Dales said: “We know the majority of cybercrime could be completely avoidable if people knew how to protect themselves.

“Our Cyber Protect Officers work with organisations and members of the public advising them on how to protect themselves from the threat of cybercrime and by working with gifted children and adults providing early intervention.”

Cyber Protect and Prevent Officer Kirsty Jackson said: “Prevention is better than the cure which is why we work so proactively by delivering presentations, utilising social media, attending events and working with local charities and organisations.”

Here’s Kirsty’s tips on staying protected:

  • Don’t allow browsers to remember passwords.
  • Log out of accounts using the ‘log-out’ option.
  • Use a Virtual Private Network (VPN) when using public free WIFI Networks.
  • Use an Antivirus package.
  • Don’t click on links or attachments from unexpected emails or messages, no matter how genuine they may seem.